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In Mathematics at Key Stage Three, we are embedding the principles of teaching for mastery. Mastering Mathematics means pupils acquiring a deep, long-term, secure and adaptable understanding of the subject. Achieving mastery means acquiring a solid enough understanding of the maths that’s been taught to enable pupils to move on to more advanced material.

Mathematics teaching for mastery rejects the idea that a large proportion of people ‘just can’t do maths’. All students are encouraged by the belief that by working hard at Mathematics they can succeed and that making mistakes is to be seen not as a failure but as a valuable opportunity for new learning.

Lessons are designed to have a high-level of teacher-student and student-student interaction where all students in the class are thinking about, working on, and discussing the same mathematical content. Challenge and the opportunity to deepen understanding of the key mathematical ideas is provided for all.

Significant time is spent developing a deep understanding of the key ideas and concepts that are needed to underpin future learning. The structures and connections within the mathematics are emphasised, which helps to ensure that students’ learning is sustainable over time.

Key facts such as number facts (including multiplication tables), formulae and relevant theorems, as well as key algebraic techniques, are learnt and practised regularly in order to avoid overloading the working memory. This helps students to focus on new ideas and concepts.

Students at Key Stage Four follow the Edexcel GCSE specification within Mathematics, this remains a tiered paper with students’ previous attainment guiding whether they follow the Higher or Foundation route of assessment. The opportunity to follow an entry level course provided by AQA is also available for some students as an alternative to or to be followed alongside GCSE. Throughout the curriculum the primary aims are to stimulate interest, confidence and enthusiasm for the different facets of the subject, while maintaining an understanding of the context and relevance of Mathematics in the wider world.